Folk in the Barn
Gig Diary

St Agnes Fountain - SOLD OUT

Wednesday 13th December 2017

Canterbury Cathedral Lodge

Albion Christmas Band - SOLD OUT

Tuesday 19th December 2017

Gulbenkian, Canterbury

Ewan McLennan

Sunday 7th January 2018

The Black Robin Inn, Kingston, Canterbury

Fraser Nimmo

Sunday 14th January 2018

The Black Robin Inn, Kingston, nr Canterbury

Miranda Sykes

Sunday 21st January 2018

The Fitzwalter Room, Goodnestone Park, Canterbury

GIG DIARY

Gregory Alan Isakov SOLD OUT ! with support from Chris Pureka

Saturday 27th October 2012

Kingston Barn


Tickets £13  in advance
£14 on the door
Doors 7.15pm for 8pm


You don’t come across people like Gregory too often. Someone described his music as “making you feel like you're in a woodland cabin with a glass of red wine, a snowstorm outside and your special someone at your side”. His voice resonates with warmth and infuses his songs with a kind of tranquil beauty – it’s remarkable stuff, once heard never forgotten. And the words "Hope was a letter I never could send / love was a country I couldn't defend." He’s one of Brandi Carlile’s favourite musicians and regularly plays with the US superstar – watch them together on YouTube playing a marvellous version of Leonard Cohen’s ‘One of Us Cannot Be Wrong’. 

Originally from Johannesburg, South Africa, Gregory Alan Isakov’s song-craft lends to the deepest lyrical masterpieces. With hints of his influences, Leonard Cohen, Iron and Wine and Kelly Joe Phelps, Gregory Alan Isakov has been described as “strong, subtle, a lyrical genius” and has shared the stage with touring artists such as Calexico, Ani Difranco, Brandi Carlile, Indigo Girls, Richie Havens, and Fiona Apple. He has performed throughout the United States and Europe and appeared at numerous music festivals such as South By Southwest, Telluride Bluegrass Festival and Rocky Mountain Folks Fest. Gregory has toured solo and with his band “The Freight”, and has released a quartet of albums:

“Evelyn' recalls Josh Ritter at his most buoyant, often, singer-songwriters can make it feel like a bit of a chore, but this one is akin to a hazy night spent on the hillside without a care in the world. Beautiful.” R2

“Gregory Alan Isakov makes quietly lush, deeply vibrant music more rooted in the starry night sky—like the one on the cover of his latest LP—than any terrestrial locale.” – Paste Magazine

"Gregory Alan Isakov proudly calls himself a folk artist, and while that's broadly accurate, it's also a tad limiting. Because while some music fans might not consider themselves fans of "folk," they still bow at the alters of Jeff Tweedy, Andrew Bird and Jolie Holland. And now you can add Isakov to that list."- Denver Post


"Gregory Alan Isakov...whose music is all tones of sepia and creeping warmth. He’s recommended for folks who appreciate warmly intelligent, rich songwriting like Jeffrey Foucault or Josh Ritter. Now living in Colorado, we are proud to call him an adopted native son. I love the sly sincerity in his voice, like he knows a secret that’s making him smile." I Am Fuel/Friends Magazine

"This Empty Northern Hemisphere—has quickly become one of my favorite singer-songwriter albums of the year. With lush, warm arrangements that create images of star-strewn skies and wave-rocked boats adrift at sea, the album spotlights Isakov's incredible artistic restraint and intuition." -about.com 

“His music coasts on the same subtle strength and gravity that Bruce Springsteen built 'Nebraska' on. Hints of everyone from Steve Earle to Gillian Welch also creep into Isakov's twangy, shaded folk, but it's his absolute ease - the man sounds like he's swimming through his own songs - that makes this such a stunning disc."  Westword




Chris Pureka will be supporting Gregory..

"For a woman who frequently performs solo and whose compositions are more quiet than clanging, Chris Pureka is making a lot of noise." -Billboard Magazine

"Introspective and deep, the landscape is akin to N
eil Young's Harvest" -
The AllMusic Guide

Chris Pureka is a breath of fresh air in an age of fleeting success and temporary notions. She is an artist of substance, armed with a sharp eye for oft-missed details and an emotional intelligence that can switch from withering to compelling with a subtle inflection. On her third release, How I Learned To See In The Dark set to hit via Sad Rabbit Music /ADA on April 13, Pureka expands on her distinct and beautiful melodies exploring broader musical soundscapes all the while maintaining the stunning vocals and distinct guitar work she is known for. 
With her 2004 debut LP, Driving North, Pureka started a career as a touring troubadour and began building an impressive fan base from the ground up: a cult following that started in her native New England and steadily grew to a national level. Fans and critics alike were drawn to the signature voice that somehow makes heartbreak sound desirable and her acute attention to lyrical detail, while others lauded her aptitude for crafting guitar parts that speak for themselves. The Boston Globe raved that "[she] is such a gifted guitar player and singer that you have to listen to each song twice, once for her guitar playing and again for her passionate lyrics about love, loss and hope." With her 2006 follow-up, Dryland, Pureka further expanded on the emotional topography she charted earlier in her career by continuing to tour extensively playing 200+ shows a year and gathering supporters city by city, show by show and fan by fan. This year Chris will take touring to the next level by adding a full backing band to her incredible live show. 
While maintaining the unique alchemy of longing, loss and hope this virtuoso sets to music, there is a sonic adventurism on How I Learned to See in the Dark that marks a new stage in Pureka's musical evolution. This is aided by Pureka's choice of co-producer and longtime friend, Merrill Garbus (4Ad's tUnE-YaRds). In addition to enjoying the comfort that comes with working with someone you've known since middle school, Garbus brought to the table her signature quirky recording techniques and alternative instrumentation, helping Pureka shift her sound into as-yet uncharted territory. This record boasts a newfound edginess, coupled with a more abstract sound and a musical depth and complexity that shines through each track, all the while maintaining the space and creative instrumentation Pureka is known for.


"A New England folkie with a parched, wounded voice and a mean way with an acoustic guitar, Pureka makes romantic depression seem, somehow, invigorating."-LA Daily News

"An interviewer asked Chris Pureka to sum up her music as a haiku. I will:  Folky sorrowful songs of loneliness and hurt, longing to reunite. Her tunes have the grave Appalachian flavor of Neil Young and Gillian Welch; her guitar playing is subdued but quietly virtuosic. And her voice can be a desolate whisper or a bitter accusation. There's no comfort, for her, in the clarity of her observations." - John Pareles, THE NEW YORK TIMES 

- Date Added 26/10/2012